Tag Archives: News

The Lists of 2010

A collection of the customary lists for 2010:

The Top Features of the Year 2010 (Nature)
Award-Winning Stories in Science (Science)
Breakthrough of the Year / Insights of the Decade (Science)
Readers’ choices: Top 10 stories of 2010 (Scientific American)
The weirdest of 2010’s Weird Science (Ars Technica)
Top 10 Stories of 2010 (Smithsonian Magazine)
The Top Dinosaur Discoveries of 2010 (Smithsonian Magazine)
Top Ten Evolution Stories of 2010 (NCSE)
‘Project Censored’ lists top stories that go unreported (CSMonitor)
Bad Faith Awards 2010 (New Humanist)
2010’s Worst Disasters in Photos (AOL News)
The Top 10 Everything of 2010 (Time)
Top 10 Windows downloads of 2010 (The Download Blog)
12 Best Internet Memes and Viral Videos of 2010 (Paste)
List of billionaires for 2010 (Forbes)
Hollywood’s Highest-Grossing Actors (Forbes)
Top Movies for 2010 (IMDB, Vanity Fair, Roger Ebert, Newsweek, NPR, NY Times, Carpetbagger)
Top 100 BitTorrent Searches of 2010
Top Music Albums of 2010 (All Music, Rolling Stone, The Guardian, Spin, Pitchfork, Paste, NPR)
Top Books of 2010 (Publisher’s Weekly, Gawker)
2010 Notable Books for Children (Smithsonian Magazine)
Word of the Year 2010 (Merriam-Webster)
50 Wonderful Things From 2010 (NPR, Monkey See)
You’re Out: 20 Things That Became Obsolete This Decade (HuffPo, pictures)

Top Lists 2010 (Google)

Debate: The Internet And Democracry

Fora TVVia Fora.tv, a debate from the Miller Center of Public Affairs:

In less than a generation, the Internet has altered the daily lives of individuals in ways few would have conceived in its nascent stages. Initially a playground for the computer savvy, the world of blogs and tweets has given equal voice to anyone with a computer and a web connection.

It is also where Americans increasingly look for news and information — according to the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, last year the Internet surpassed newspapers as the source of national and international news, nearly doubling from the year before. Barack Obama channeled the power of the Internet to reach millions during his presidential campaign, and his administration has launched innovative methods to use the Internet to govern.

Debaters include:
Pro: Andrew Keen, author, The Cult of the Amateur: How Today’s Internet is Killing Our Culture
Pro: Farhad Manjoo, journalist for Slate, author of True Enough: Learning to Live in a Post-Fact Society

Con: Jimmy Wales, founder, Wikipedia
Con: Micah L. Sifry, editor, Personal Democracy Forum

Also see the excerpt on YouTube called Is Civil Discussion Possible on the Anonymous Internet?