Tag Archives: probability

Sharon Bertsch McGrayne: The Theory That Would Not Die

A new Authors@Google Talk by Sharon Bertsch McGrayne:
<param name="allowFullScreen" Wrapping value=”true” />

“The Theory That Would Not Die: How Bayes’ Rule Cheap Ray Ban Sunglasses Cracked the Enigma Code, Hunted Down Russian Submarines, and Emerged Triumphant from Two Centuries of Controversy”

Bayes‘ rule appears to be a straightforward, one-line theorem: by updating our initial beliefs with objective new information, we get a new and improved belief. To its adherents, it is an elegant statement about learning from experience. To its opponents, it is subjectivity run amok.
The Theory That Would Not Die (Book Cover)
In the first-ever account of Bayes’ rule for general readers, Sharon Bertsch McGrayne explores this controversial theorem and the human obsessions surrounding it. She traces its discovery by an amateur mathematician in the 1740s through its development into roughly its modern form by French scientist Pierre Simon Laplace. She reveals why respected statisticians rendered it professionally taboo for 150 NFL Jerseys Cheap years—at the same time that practitioners relied on it to solve crises involving great uncertainty and scanty information, even breaking Germany’s Enigma code during World War II, and explains how the advent of off-the-shelf computer technology in the 1980s proved to be a game-changer. Today, Bayes’ rule is wholesale jerseys used everywhere from DNA de-coding to Homeland Security.

Sharon Bertsch McGrayne is the author of numerous books, including Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries and Prometheans in the Lab: Chemistry and the Making of the Modern World. She is a prize-winning former reporter for Scripps-Howard, Gannett, Crain’s, and other newspapers and has spoken at many scientific conferences, national laboratories, and Wholesale nfl Jerseys universities in the hockey jerseys United States and abroad. She lives in Seattle with her husband, George F. Bertsch, professor of physics at the University of Washington.download movie Split 2017 now

Also see John Allen Paulos’ review of the book in The New York Times.
To get a great intro on the Bayes Theorem read Elizier Yudkowsky’s An Intuitive Explanation of Bayes’ Theorem.
Finally, there’s a visual introduction to Bayes’ Theorem by Oscar Bonilla.

(function(d, s, id) {
var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];
if (d.getElementById(id)) return;
js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;
js.src = “//connect.facebook.net/en_CA/all.js#xfbml=1&appId=117234944961232”;
fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);
}(document, “script”, “facebook-jssdk”));

(function(d, s, id) {
var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];
if (d.getElementById(id)) return;
js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;
js.src = “//connect.facebook.net/en_CA/all.js#xfbml=1&appId=117234944961232”;
fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);
}(document, “script”, “facebook-jssdk”));

Richard Feynman: The Character of Physical Law

Richard FeynmanThe Character of Physical Law are a series of seven lectures by physicist Richard Feynman concerning the nature of the laws of physics.

The talks were delivered by Feynman in 1964 at Cornell University, as part of the Messenger Lectures series.Watch Full Movie Online Streaming Online and Download

Their text was published by the BBC in 1965 in a book by the same name.

The lectures covered the following topics:

  1. The law of gravitation, an example of physical law
  2. The relation of mathematics to physics
  3. The great conservation principles
  4. Symmetry in physical law
  5. The distinction of past and future
  6. Probability and uncertainty – the quantum mechanical view of nature
  7. Seeking new laws

The YouTube playlist below has all seven lectures totalling six hours:

Alternatively, view an enhanced version at Project Tuva by Microsoft Research.

(function(d, s, id) {
var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];
if (d.getElementById(id)) return;
js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;
js.src = “//connect.facebook.net/en_CA/all.js#xfbml=1&appId=117234944961232”;
fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);
}(document, “script”, “facebook-jssdk”));